Dean Koontz’s The Silent Corner-Jane Hawk 1

Overview: Going off-grid isn’t as easy as anyone might think. Most of the newest technology, if not all of it, is easily tracked. You have to be dedicated to shunning it. Jane Hawk has that dedication. She has to. Two months ago, her happy, optimistic husband, Nick, committed suicide in their bathroom. The thing is, his note was weird to those who read it. And like any good investigator working in law enforcement, Jane digs into it. Maybe ‘They’ shouldn’t have threatened her.

Story Telling: We have a ‘dark government’ type of thriller this time. Too bad it’s the beginning of a series.

Dislikes: The ‘They’ in this book needs a clear cut case of karma. No member of humankind deserves, is owed, or has the right to play ‘god.’ I don’t always like the results of God’s ordering of the world, but at least we actually have choices.

Likes: Jane has a drive to stop evil that is very much admirable. As well, she was able to find friends in the most unlikely of places.

Nathan Silverman seemed to have a strong sense of right and wrong. That and his drive for justice, made him a great man.

Favorite Character: Now this is a toss-up between Nathan and Dougal. Nathan was willing to give a friend the benefit of the doubt. And Dougal has yet to find a good cause that he doesn’t like.

Favorite Quote: Here’s one for those who wish to twist Scripture as a reason to hate the rich. “Wealth had not corrupted him. What he’d chosen to do with his wealth corrupted him.”

Favorite Scene: It’s the time that Jane spent with Travis. The little guy wasn’t sure of what he wanted more, riding or Mommy.

Conclusion: Keep in mind that this is the beginning of a series. So, it will be a slow start. If you can get by that, it’s a great book.

Dean Koontz’s Winter Moon

Overview: Jack and Heather McGarvey have had a very interesting year. But it’s beginning to look up.. The father to one of Jack’s closest friends and former partner has left them a major windfall. Say goodbye to the violence of the city life. No more hour-long commutes to the closest store. Hello snow, quietness, good clean mountain air. What could possibly go wrong? Um, should we tell them that they are in a Dean Koontz book?

Story Telling: Mr. Koontz has a few different storylines. This one is a monster book.

Dislikes: This is kind of hard to explain. Perhaps, it’s because I’ve started with Mr. Koontz’s later books, but this one seemed to be missing something. Even the ending left something to be desired.

Likes: Eduardo was a neat old man. He may have preferred the more, down-to-earth stories, but he was willing to shift his thinking to fit the facts as presented.

Eagle’s Roost seems like a nice place to live, if the snow wasn’t such a threat.

Favorite Character: Harlan Moffit. I can’t tell you much about him, but this is the guy who is good for a party.

Favorite Quote: This one is pretty strong, you might want to read the whole thing in context. “Luther saw it coming years ago. Said politicians were tearing down a thousand years of civilization brick by brick but weren’t building anything to replace it.”

Favorite Scene: It would be when Toby got his dog. As well as when Paul was playing word games with Toby.

Conclusion: There is a lot of hope in this book, but it isn’t one of Mr. Koontz’s best. If you don’t mind a little uncertainty, give this one a shot.

Dean Koontz’s The Servants of Twilight

Overview: Single mother Christine Scavello has had a bit of luck after years of an oppressed childhood. Unfortunately, nothing in her life has prepared her for this. Her son, Joey, for all of his sweetness, has run afoul of an old woman. There’s something about her that seems unnatural. She seems to have latched onto the idea that Joey must die. Who can Christine turn to in order to save her son?

Story Telling: This is a supernatural thriller. And please, don’t start thinking werewolves and vampires. I have yet to see Mr. Koontz write about those.

Dislikes: Mother Grace may have claimed to be working for God, but–truly–you only have to look at her fruit. Outside of putting an entire city ‘under the ban,’ has God ever demanded the death of a child?

Also I expected little more from the ending. This disconnect could be because this book was one of Mr. Koontz’s earlier novels.

Likes: Charlie was very determined to do the right thing by Christine and Joey.

Denton Boothe was the biggest help Charlie or Christine could have had.

Favorite Character: It would be either Denton Boothe or Kyle Barlowe.

Favorite Quote: Here’s something you might want to remember. “The thought is father to the deed, right?”

Favorite Scene: It would be when Henry and Charlie went to see Denton Boothe.

Conclusion: Like I said earlier, the ending is where I felt disappointment in the story. Other than that, we had quite the interesting ride.

Dean Koontz’s The Dead Town-Frankenstein 5

Overview: It’s finally time for the final showdown between the creation and his cruel creator, by proxy so to speak. Victor Immaculate thinks that his plans, for the annihilation of the world, are coming into fruition. The residents of Rainbow Falls and Deucalion’s team have a few arguments against that plan. Who will win the fight for life itself?

Story Telling: Once again, we step into the world of the mad-scientist. I wonder who inspired this vision.

Likes: You have to give the regular people in this book credit. Their situations weren’t the most hopeful, but they didn’t roll over and give up. They resisted to the best of their abilities, even if a few of them needed some external influence to do so.

Xerox-Bozeman was sad, yet in a way, hopeful. I saw him as proof, at least in Mr. Koontz’s world, that God can reach anyone.

And of course, Jocko is back, along with Erika.

Dislikes: You know, if Victor’s clone wasn’t actually trying to destroy humanity, I’d have found his arrogance hilarious. Oh, he’s so perfect, therefore his creations are perfect. Maybe he should ask God His opinion on that one.

And the ‘Builders’ are just gross.

Favorite Character: This might be a list. There was the Riders in the Sky congregation, Rudy, Sammy, Sully, Grace, Bryce, um…maybe I should wrap this up, Jocko and Erika.

Favorite Quote: We have two this time around. First off we get Mr. Koontz’s view on Hollywood’s view on the middle-class. “ It was the kind of modest, but well-detailed house that, back in the day, Hollywood routinely portrayed as the home of any reputable middle-class family like Andy Hardy and his dad the judge, before moviemakers decided that the middle-class was nothing but a dangerous conspiracy of dim-witted, grasping, bigoted know-nothings whose residences in films should reveal their stupidity, ignorance, boring conformity, greed, racism, fundamental festering evil.”

And now we see the people themselves. ““Most of them are not that way,” the giant says. “But among them are enough like you, Victor, to lead them astray again and again, to be their conniving politicians and their self-sickened intellectuals, their self-satisfied elites who seduce them away from their better natures. There is a serpent in the world, and having signed a pledge with it, you spent your life–your lives–spreading its venom.””

Favorite Scene: I loved the code name that the Riders gave Deucalion. It was perfect. And Victor’s punishment fit his crimes. Oh! The way that Carson and Michael met the Riders was fun.

Conclusion: This is a great story. Unfortunately, it is now over. The only people who might have a problem with this series, are those who have a problem with God showing up in books, but if that’s a pet-peeve of yours, then why are you reading a Dean Koontz novel anyway.

Dean Koontz’s Lost Souls-Frankenstein 4

Overview: And it only gets better. Erika Swedenborg, formerly Erika Five, has just had the shock of her life. She just saw a dead man walking. Victor Frankenstein died in New Orleans, Louisiana, so how is he still walking around in Rainbow Falls, Montana? And why? One thing is for certain. It’s time to call in the re-enforcements. Luckily for all involved, er most of time anyway, Deucalion has also started having suspicions that Victor has returned. Will killing him twice end his reign of terror? Or is this Victor Frankenstein worse than the original?

Story Telling: Once again, we’ve gotten a science-fiction tale, complete with robots this time.

Likes: Oh, how cute. Erika got flirted with. Even cuter? She’s not even aware of it.

Jocko has become the world’s greatest hacker. I call it cheating. He uses all four limbs.

Carson needs help. Her mommy instincts are getting in the way of her nerve. It was kind of cute when she used her instincts to get information out of the editor.

Dislikes: I just thought that the original Victor Frankenstein was egotistical. I was wrong. His clone is much worse. But, you have to give him credit. He is dedicated enough to soprano-ize himself. Poor deluded idiot.

The Builders are gross. That’s all I’m going to say about that.

Oh, I had a problem with how Carson and Michael dealt with Chrissy. I don’t know how to handle that situation, but there had to be a better way than lying.

Nummy’s Grandmama didn’t do him any favors. Yes, according to the world, Nummy was incapable of thinking clearly, but that doesn’t make him stupid. Everyone can learn. Nummy can have some responsibility. It’s my belief, I guess. Everyone is a genius in his or her field, and an idiot in another’s field.

Favorite Character: So many of the townspeople had good hearts. Also Erika has proven herself to be a good mother.

Favorite Quote: Deucalion would make a wonderful mystic. ““Like life everywhere,” Deucalion replied. “Meaningful from top to bottom, but mysterious in every direction.””

Favorite Scene: This one is a little tricky. Mainly because there were two…chapters. And you get the best effect by reading the whole chapter.

The first one was when Erika returns home with the Jim James Bakery cinnamon rolls. To put it mildly, it’s Jocko’s antics that make the chapter.

The second is when the Builders tried to crash The Riders in the Sky Church Social. Tried being the operative word. That’s all you’re getting. Just remember, this is small town Montana. The only thing worse for the Builders would have been small town Texas.

Conclusion: This one kind of ended on a cliffhanger. But I liked it. Come on book five.

Dean Koontz’s Dead and Alive-Frankenstein 3

Overview: A storm is threatening New Orleans, and it’s not the one being brewed by Mother Nature. Well, she does help. Victor Helios doesn’t seem to see that his creations are inherently flawed. Deucalion and his all too human partners, Carson and Michael, are determined to put an end to the madman once and for all.

Story Telling: You cannot have a book about a mad scientist without it being a science-fiction novel. Yes, there’s a lot of action, but Victor makes it science-fiction.

Likes: Erika Five and Jocko were great. Victor may have hated love, but both of them were able to prove Jesus’ point of the greatest love of all.

Michael and Carson still have a fun relationship.

There are some nifty surprises in Victor’s landfill.

Dislikes: There for a bit, I was sure that Victor was going to drown when the hurricane hit. He is so full of himself, that he forgot one key of creation. The created cannot be more than the creator. It just doesn’t happen that way.

Some of Bucky and Janet’s scenes seemed to be too much for my tastes.

Favorite Character: Other than Deucalion, it would be Jocko and Erika.

Favorite Quote: We have two, again. First, from Erika Five: “And if the universe was not, as Victor said, a meaningless chaos, if it were possible for anything to be sacred, surely humble items, worn by martyred innocents, were hallowed and might provide her friend not only with a disguise but also with protection of a higher kind.”

And the second from Jocko: “Jocko could know what it’s like to have a mother. And you could know what it’s like to be one. It would be a little family, but still a family.

Favorite Scene: It was perfect when Erika and Jocko were surrounded by the lightning.

Conclusion: This was a terrific story. You can’t say that he middle book of the series fell flat. Onto the fourth book.

Dean Koontz and Ed Gorman’s City of Night-Frankenstein 2

Overview: It’s been less that twenty-four hours since the events of “Prodigal Son.” Detectives O’Connor and Maddison are all-in, so to speak, when it concerns stopping Victor Helios. Along with Deucalion, they are trying to figure out where Helios’s main base of operations is located. The only question is if Helios will find them before they are ready for him?

Story Telling: We are continuing with the Frankenstein story. So, there’s monsters of both the created and human varieties.

Likes: Deucalion has managed to find a way to control his temper. It’s a very unique way. I don’t think that those boys liked it very much.

Lulana, Evangeline, and Moses are doing the best they can for their community, and their boss.

We meet Erika Five, and she seems to be smarter than the rest. Could she be Frankenstein’s doom?

Dislikes: Benny and Cindi were nuts, and only one of them could see it. And that was only partially.

Helios isn’t just cruel, as I had thought from the beginning, he is blind to his mistakes and sins.

Favorite Character: I think I’ll go with Deucalion.

Favorite Quote: “Nevertheless, what will come will come, and each of us must face it in his own way, with as much courage as he can….”

Favorite Scene: Well, we have the one where we see Deucalion’s form of anger management. Or when he gets Arnie to safety. Or the time that Deucalion spends comforting the replaced Pastor Kenny. That one was kind of sweet.

Conclusion: This one was pretty good. Though, the ending was kind of weird. What was the purpose of introducing that last couple?

Dean Koontz and Kevin J. Anderson’s Prodigal Son-Frankenstein 1

Overview: Forget what you may know of ‘Frankenstein.’ Mary Shelley, so obviously, pegged Victor wrong. He wasn’t trying to just create life, he was trying to improve humanity. Deucalion, his first–and most famous–creation doesn’t quite agree. So, how do you stop someone if there is a safety switch embedded in you to keep you from killing him? Get an accomplice or two. And this is where Detective’s O’Conner and Maddison come in. Of course, they have to find a serial killer first….

Story Telling: This is what we would call a re-telling novel. Not that I personally call it a re-telling, more of a continuance of the original novel–if you ignore Frankenstein’s demise.

Likes: How about this! Nobody here is a “woe is me” character. There is no whining. This is a major improvement.

Carson is a pretty brave woman. Not only did she try to keep her city safe, she also worked to keep her brother with her.

Deucalion is an amazing guy. I liked his attitude.

A few of the so-called New Race are showing some of the gifts of the Old.

Dislikes: Victor Helios nee Frankenstein has a big problem with this thing called an ego. His is too big. Way too big. We complain when God plays god. What makes man think that he can do any better. Plus, he is just cruel.

Poor Roy Pribeaux. His ideas of perfection are good for a laugh, as long as you don’t see how he is trying to find his ‘perfect’ woman.

Favorite Character: Both Erika Four and Patrick Duchaine showed the hope for the New Race.

Favorite Quote: ““Victor was a man,” Deucalion continued, “but made a monster of himself. I was a monster…but feel so human now.””

Favorite Scene: Almost any of Deucalion’s entrances or exits were fun. Also, I wouldn’t mind living around Kathleen Burke’s place. We might trade books.

Conclusion: I’m glad that I went ahead and read this book. Now, I have to find the rest of the series, so I can see what happens to the would-be god. Even those who don’t like the original story, will enjoy Mr. Koontz’s variation.

Dean Koontz’s Every Day’s a Holiday-Amusing Rhymes for Happy Times

Overview: And now, back to poems. This time the poems are tied to a single theme. Mr. Koontz has just about every holiday celebrated, as well as a few spontaneous additions.

Story Telling: We just get to see a bunch of little rhymes.

Artwork: Mr. Parks kept with the penciled illustrations. This time the game is played with toads.

Favorite Poems: Both “Memorial Day” and “Christmas Day” were beautiful. “Martin Luther King, Jr. Day” was a good reminder. And “Me Day” was just fun.

Conclusion: Another great book. And like before, I didn’t find all of the toads.

Dean Koontz’s Ashley Bell

Overview: Bibi Blair is a young woman who seems to have her life ahead of her. Her fiance is on a mission with his SEAL team, and soon to be home. Oddly enough Bibi gets both bad news, she has cancer, and good news, it’s been miraculously healed, in all of two days. A chance encounter tells Bibi why she was spared. A creep named Terezin has a girl by the name of Ashley Bell. Bibi has to save her, but who is she?

Story Telling: Mr. Koontz has often used the ideas of science-fiction in his works. This book is a bit more fantastical in it’s workings. Don’t be too quick to judge this book over one of Mr. Koontz’s techniques. Yes, the modern wisdom says never to use it, but that’s because of how easy it is to mess the story up.

Likes: Bibi’s “Captain” grandfather was exactly what she needed at the time.

Paxton will make a good husband. He was right by Bibi as soon as he was able.

Pogo is a great friend, though I don’t think he is that good of an employee. Not caring for money can cut both ways.

Dislikes: For starters, Solange St. Croix is a big problem. If you have to make a public mask for yourself, then you will–in the long run–be living a lie.

Terezin is just too cold for my tastes. But I have to admit, that he was easy to spot.

Now here comes a bit of a delicate situation. I have no doubt that Nancy and Murphy loved Bibi. However, their reliance on fate is dangerous to my mind. Yes, there are things that you cannot change. But that doesn’t mean that you don’t try. You change what you can, even if it is only yourself.

Favorite Character: Oh, I’d say that it was a three-way tie between Paxton, Pogo, and Toba.

Favorite Quote: Mr. Koontz does have a sense of humor. “Okay, you’ve got me, I am caught, revealed. Before I was Calida Butterfly, I was of course Calida Caterpillar.”

Favorite Scene: There were two. Bibi’s escape with the Hermiones was clever. And Paxton’s and Pogo’s visit with Nancy and Murphy after they repaired Bibi’s old recorder was fascinating.

Conclusion: This novel is no where near the heights that Mr. Koontz reached with “Watchers,” “By the Light of the Moon,” or “Strangers.” But it’s not as bad as “The Bad Place.” You’ll see some fascinating ideas in this one, at the very least.