Ben Blatt’s Nabokov’s Favorite Word is Mauve-What the Numbers Reveal about the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing

I received this book for the purpose of a fair and honest review.

Overview: Have you ever wondered if two books were by the same author, or co-author? Do you wonder if you can find your favorite author’s fingerprints? If you are a word-nerd or any fancier of the written word, this might be a book you find interesting.

Story Telling: This is a non-fiction book. It focuses more on the statistics, instead of the written word.

Dislikes: The major problem was the focus on the statistics, especially during the comparisons of male and female authors. You see, Mr. Blatt used e-books for his research so, in some cases, it was pretty evident that he hadn’t read the books. His example for the differences in men and women writers was J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.” Yes, there aren’t any female characters in the unexpected party. But, that doesn’t mean that there wasn’t any mention of the women in Tolkien’s world. There are more ways to refer to women besides ‘she’ and ‘her.’ Besides, while men will write more adventures and war novels, women tend to write more romances and erotica (can you really tell the difference today?). Guess when genre requires both genders?

Also, the reading grade levels seem to be inaccurate. While the words might be simple or monosyllable, no one–in his or her right mind–would give “Fifty Shades of Grey” to an elementary student.

Likes: A lot of this was fascinating. Some of the ways they proved authorship was cool. Even when the authorship was a known pseudonym, the processed worked with surprising accuracy.

The quotes were fun, and–at times–encouraging.

Favorite Section: That would be the section on the differences in the cover designs.

Favorite Quote: Granted, this one isn’t from the author, but it fits. “Your style is an emanation from your own being.–Katherine Anne Porter”

Conclusion: This is a fascinating book. Just be careful about the knowledge you receive. Like the grade levels, you have to consider each book and the reader at the time.

Carole P. Roman’s If You Were Me and Lived In…the Mayan Empire

I received this book courtesy of Mrs. Roman for the purpose of a fair and honest review.

Overview: Let’s kick off the time machine. This time we’re heading to the Mayan Empire. What are we going to learn on this trip?

Story Telling: Once again, we have a historical cultural book.

Artwork: We get more realistic looking illustrations.

Likes: Somehow, Mrs. Roman kept the violence of the Mayans out of this book.

Conclusion: This is a decent starter book for Southern and Central America. However, wait until your children are older to continue the lessons.

Carole P. Roman’s If You Were Me and Lived In…Germany

I received this book courtesy of Mrs. Roman for the purpose of a fair and honest review.

Overview: It’s time to start a new journey. We’re on our way to one of the crown jewels of the European Union. What will Germany teach us on this trip?

Story Telling: Once again, we have a cultural travelogue.

Artwork: We have a mix-media platform with this book. The illustrations are mixed with photography.

Likes: We still have the pronunciation key. Also, the words are rather easy to pronounce, this time. That’s always a benefit.

Conclusion: This was an interesting book. Enjoy it wit your little ones.